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" For the mind of man is far from the nature of a clear and equal glass, wherein the beams of things should reflect according to their true incidence; nay, it is rather like an enchanted glass, full of superstition and imposture, if it be not delivered... "
The Works of Francis Bacon - Page 142
by Francis Bacon (visct. St. Albans.) - 1819
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Francis Bacon: The Temper of a Man

Catherine Drinker Bowen - Biography & Autobiography - 1993 - 245 pages
...beams of things should reflect according to their true incidence. Nay rather, it is like an enchanted glass, full of superstition and imposture, if it be not delivered and reduced." And elsewhere, urging men not to fear passion in their intellectuality: "Icarus, being in the pride...
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Francis Bacon: History, Politics and Science, 1561-1626

Brian Harvey Goodwin Wormald, Wormald Brian Harvey Goodwin - History - 1993 - 436 pages
...beams of things should reflect according to their true incidence; nay, it is rather like an enchanted glass, full of superstition and imposture, if it be not delivered and reduced.'11 Even if logicians could be converted to recognizing this, their logic would be incapable...
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Magic, Rhetoric, and Literacy: An Eccentric History of the Composing Imagination

William A. Covino - Language Arts & Disciplines - 1994 - 208 pages
...beams of things should reflect according to their true incidence; nay, it is rather like an enchanted glass, full of superstition and imposture, if it be not delivered and reduced. (Advancement 2.14.9; 132) As DP Walker concludes, "Bacon still believed in the traditional doctrine...
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Rethinking Objectivity

Allan Megill - Philosophy - 1994 - 356 pages
...observer. Three centuries ago, Sir Francis Bacon suggested that the "mind of man" is an "enchanted glass, full of superstition and imposture, if it be not delivered and reduced."40 As late- or post-moderns, we can hardly hope that this delivery and reduction will ever...
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Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz: Critical Assessments, Volume 1

R. S. Woolhouse - Reference - 1993 - 536 pages
...42. Boyle, Works, vol. Ill, p. 41. 43. This doctrine is also in Bacon, Advancement of Learning Bk.II: 'Let us consider the false appearances that are imposed upon us by words, which are framed and applied according to the conceit and capacities of the vulgar sort.' Works,...
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A Genealogy of Sovereignty

Jens Bartelson - Political Science - 1995 - 338 pages
...beams of things should reflect according to their true incidence; nay, it is rather like an enchanted glass, full of superstition and imposture, if it be not delivered and reduced'.35 In order to dust off and disenchant the glass, the referential possibility of language...
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Instruments and the Imagination

Thomas L. Hankins, Robert J. Silverman - Science - 1999 - 358 pages
...beams of things should reflect according to their true incidence; nay, it is rather like an enchanted glass, full of superstition and imposture, if it be not delivered and reduced."11 In this analogy Bacon compared the imagination to a favorite instrument of natural magic...
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Realismustheorien in England (1692-1919)

Walter F. Greiner, Fritz Kemmler - Criticism - 1997 - 282 pages
...beams of things should reflect according to their true incidence; nay, it is father like an enchanted glass, full of superstition and imposture, if it be not delivered and reduced." (The Advancement of Learning [1605]. — Hier zit. nach der Ausgabe in der Everyman's Library, ed....
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Francis Bacon

Perez Zagorin - Biography & Autobiography - 1999 - 318 pages
...of the understanding; for rather than reflecting things as they are, the mind is "like an enchanted glass, full of superstition and imposture, if it be not delivered and reduced." He listed three categories of such false appearances. The first, "the root of all superstition," was...
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Labyrinth: A Search for the Hidden Meaning of Science

Peter Pesic - Science - 2001 - 202 pages
...presumption? The human mind is not a faithful mirror of the world, as Aristotle taught, but "an enchanted glass, full of superstition and imposture, if it be not delivered and reduced." Our vision is distorted and corrupt, ruled by idols of common delusion. Science can only advance if...
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