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" For the mind of man is far from the nature of a clear and equal glass, wherein the beams of things should reflect according to their true incidence; nay, it is rather like an enchanted glass, full of superstition and imposture, if it be not delivered... "
The Works of Francis Bacon - Page 142
by Francis Bacon (visct. St. Albans.) - 1819
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Michigan Alumnus, Volume 15

Cooking - 1908 - 972 pages
...their quest of truth, perceived that there were four grounds of human error. Of these the first is "the false appearances that are imposed upon us by the general nature of the mind" of man. In this refractory mind of man "the beams of things" do not "reflect according to their true...
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Adventures in Essay Reading: Essays for First-year Students Selected by the ...

University of Michigan. Department of Rhetoric and Journalism - American essays - 1923 - 430 pages
...their quest of truth, perceived that there were four grounds of human error. Of these the first is "the false appearances that are imposed upon us by the general nature of the mind" of man. The mind is always prone to accept the affirmative or active as proof rather than the negative...
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The Bombay University Calendar, Volume 2

University of Bombay - 1907
...beams of things should reflect according to their true incidence ; nay, it is rather like an enchanted glass, full of superstition and imposture, if it be not delivered and reduced." (6) The ancient opinion that man was miarocosmus, an abstract or model of the world, hath been fantastically...
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England, Volume 1

Francis Bacon - 1844 - 586 pages
...beams of things should reflect according to their true incidence,nay, it is rather like an enchanted glass, full of superstition and imposture, if it be not delivered and reduced. 14. The mind is more affected by affirmatives than negatives. ' As was well answered by Diagoras to...
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Letters on the Laws of Man's Nature and Development

Henry George Atkinson, Harriet Martineau - Psychology - 1851 - 420 pages
...this ; and we must not let the truth escape us. " The mind of Man," says Bacon, "is like an enchanted glass; full of superstition and imposture, if it be not delivered and reduced." — "Nay,* it is not credible, till it be opened, what a number of fictions and fancies the similitude...
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