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" As for Jonson, to whose character I am now arrived, if we look upon him while he was himself, (for his last plays were but his dotages) I think him the most learned and judicious writer which any theatre ever had. "
The Lives of the Poets-laureate: With an Introductory Essay on the Title and ... - Page 106
by Wiltshire Stanton Austin, John Ralph - 1853 - 428 pages
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English Prose and Poetry

John Matthews Manly - English literature - 1926 - 928 pages
...or affected peculiarity of thought or action obsolete, and Ben Jonson's wit cornea short of theirs. back I always hear Time's winged chariot hurrying...Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound My echoing s theater ever had. He was a most severe judge of himself, as well as others. One cannot say he wanted...
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Century Readings in the English Essay

Louis Wann - American essays - 1926 - 560 pages
...fecting the stage as any wherewith the he was himself (for his last plays were 40 French can furnish us. but his dotages), I think him the most learned and...most severe judge of himself, as well as others. One JOHN LOCKE (1632-1704) cannot say he wanted wit, but rather that 45 he was frugal of it. In his works...
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Introduction. List of Dryden's works. Epistle dedicatory of the Rival ladies ...

John Dryden - 1926 - 414 pages
...wit comes short of theirs, izs ., ftr ' As forJohns.Qn,-to whose character I am now arrived, O^" ' if we look upon him while he was himself (for his last r N plays were but his dotages), I think him the jnost../ <.Ar ' learned jmd judicious writer which...
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Prefatory note. The text. Introduction. Chronology. Genealogical table. A ...

Thomas Shadwell - Artists' books - 1927 - 598 pages
...John Dryden, with whom Shadwell was then on good terms. p. 187. FEWER FAILINGS. " As for Johnson, ... I think him the most learned and judicious Writer which any theatre ever had." Dryden, Of Dramatick Poesie, an essay. 410, 1668. p. 187. INTER QUAE VERBUM. Horace, Epiftularum, II,...
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Of Dramatick Poesie: An Essay, 1668

John Dryden, Thomas Stearns Eliot - Literary Criticism - 1928 - 120 pages
...and Ben. Johnson's wit comes short of theirs. As for Johnson, to whose Character I am now arriv'd, if we look upon him while he was himself, (for his last Playes were but his dotages) I think him the most learned and judicious Writer which any Theater ever...
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A Critical History of English Literature: Shakespeare to Milton, Volume 2

David Daiches - 1979 - 304 pages
...English literature. CHAPTER TEN Drama from Jonson to the Closing of the Theaters As FOR JONSON, ... I think him the most learned and judicious writer which any theatre ever had. . . . He was deeply conversant in the Ancients, both Greek and Latin, and he borrowed boldly from them. ... If I...
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Sources of Dramatic Theory: Volume 1, Plato to Congreve

Michael J. Sidnell - Drama - 1991 - 332 pages
...language is likewise a little obsolete, and Ben fonson's wit comes short of theirs. 'As for fonson, to whose character I am now arrived, if we look upon him while he was himself ffor his last plays were but his dotagesl, I think him the most learned and ludicious writer which...
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Northrop Frye's Notebooks on Renaissance Literature

Northrop Frye - Literary Collections - 2006 - 561 pages
...in Selected Works of John Dryden, ed. William Frost (New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1953), 365: "As for Jonson, to whose character I am now arrived,...and judicious writer which any theatre ever had." 5 Conventionally, the protasis, epistasis, and catastasis, were the first, second, and third parts...
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The Dublin University Magazine: A Literary and Political Journal, Volume 42

1853 - 852 pages
...Jonson we find in the volume before us, and from it we give a few sentences : — " As for Jonson, if we look upon him while he was himself (for his...had. He was a most severe judge of himself as well us others. One cannot say he wanted wit, but rather that he was frugal of it. In his works you lind...
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