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" As for Jonson, to whose character I am now arrived, if we look upon him while he was himself, (for his last plays were but his dotages) I think him the most learned and judicious writer which any theatre ever had. "
The Lives of the Poets-laureate: With an Introductory Essay on the Title and ... - Page 106
by Wiltshire Stanton Austin, John Ralph - 1853 - 428 pages
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The Elements of English Composition

David Irving - English language - 1841 - 448 pages
...some great occasion is presented to him. * * * As for Johnson, to whose character I am now arriv'd, if we look upon him while he was himself (for his last plays were but his dotages) I think him the moat learned and judicious writer which any theater ever had. He was a most severe judge of himself...
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The Works of John Dryden: In Verse and Prose, with a Life, Volume 2

John Dryden, John Mitford - 1844 - 536 pages
...humours. Shakspeare's language is likewise a little ohsolete, and Ben Jonson's wit comes short of theirs. As for Jonson, to whose character I am now Arrived,...him while he was himself, (for his last plays were hut his dotages,) I think him the most learned and judicious writer which any theatre ever had. He...
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Specimens of the British Critics

John Wilson - Criticism - 1846 - 360 pages
...John Suckling, and with him the greater part of the courtiers, set our Shakspeare far above him. " As for Jonson, to whose character I am now arrived,...writer which any theatre ever had. He was a most severe judge—of himself as well as others. One cannot say he wanted wit, but rather that he was frugal of...
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A Compendium of English Literature: Chronologically Arranged, from Sir John ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - English literature - 1856 - 800 pages
...Suckling, and with him the greater part of the courtiers, set our Shakspeare far above him. BEX JONSON. As for Jonson, to whose character I am now arrived, if we look upon hirn while he was himself, (for his last plays were but his dotages,) I think him the most learned...
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Biographical Sketches of Eminent British Poets: Chronologically Arranged ...

English poetry - 1857 - 574 pages
...warm admirer of Jonson's poetical genius. His character of the dramatist is highly favourable : — " As for Jonson, to whose character I am now arrived,...any theatre ever had. He was a most severe judge of himeelf, as well as others. One cannot say ho wanted wit, but rather that he was frugal of it. In his...
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Principles of Elocution

Thomas Ewing - Elocution - 1857 - 428 pages
...which any poet ever wrote, but, he would produce it much better done in Shakspeare. As for Jonson, if we look upon him while he was himself, (for his...had. He was a most severe judge of himself as well as of others. One cannot say he wanted wit, but rather that he was frugal of it. In his works you find...
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The Works of John Dryden: In Verse and Prose, Volume 2

John Dryden - 1859 - 482 pages
...humours. Shakspeare's language is likewise a little ohsolete, and Ben Jonson's wit Comes short of theirs. As for Jonson, to whose character I am now arrived,...him while he was himself, (for his last plays were hut his dotages,) I think him the most learned and judicious writer which any theatre ever had. Hu...
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A Compendium of English Literature: Chronologically Arranged, from Sir John ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - English literature - 1865 - 784 pages
...Sucklinjr and with him the greater part of the courtiers, set our Shakspean; far above him. BEN JONSON. As for Jonson, to whose character I am now arrived, if we lool upon him while he was himself, (for his last plays were but hi: dotages,) I think him the most...
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English Composition and Rhetoric: A Manual

Alexander Bain - English language - 1867 - 352 pages
...passage. 1. "As for Jonson, to whose character I (am) 'have' now ar" rived, if we look upon him whilst he was himself — for his last "plays were (but)...him the most learned and "judicious writer (which) ' that ' any theatre ever had." Although a little cumbrous, this sentence is unobjectionable in arrangement....
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Studies in English prose: specimens, with notes, by J. Payne

Joseph Payne - 1868 - 530 pages
...phraseology, " Arrived the happy isle." Sec note 2, p. 66. 3. BEN JONSON.1 (FROM THE SAME WORK.) „ As for Jonson, to whose character I am now arrived,...himself (for his last plays were but his dotages) (ie written in his dotage), I think him the" most learned and judicious writer which any theatre ever...
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