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" But the greatest error of all the rest, is the mistaking or misplacing of the last or furthest end of knowledge : for men have entered into a desire of learning and knowledge, sometimes upon a natural curiosity, and inquisitive appetite ; sometimes to... "
The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England: A New Edition: - Page 51
by Francis Bacon, Basil Montagu - 1825
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My Novel: Or, Varieties in English Life, Volume 1

Edward Bulwer Lytton Lytton - English fiction - 1851 - 444 pages
...or sale, but a rich storehouse for the glory of the Creator, and the relief of men's estate."* • * "But the greatest error of all the rest is the mistaking or misplacing of the last or farthest end of knowledge: — for men have entered into a desire of learning and knowledge, sometimes...
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 69

England - 1851 - 812 pages
...intellectual." LEONARD. — "That is true — we so understood it." " PARSON. — " Thus, when this great * " But the greatest error of all the rest is the mistaking or misplacing of the last or farthest end of knowledge: — for men пате entered into a desire of learning and knowledge, sometimes...
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 69

England - 1851 - 792 pages
...intellectual." LEONARD. — " That is true— we so understood it." PARSON. — " Thus, when this great ' '' But the greatest error of all the rest is the mistaking or misplacing of the last or farthest end of knowledge :— for men have entered into a desire of learning and knowledge, sometimes...
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My Novel Or Varieties in English Life, Volume 1

Edward Bulwer Lytton Baron Lytton - 1851 - 820 pages
...sale, but a rich storehouse for the glory of the Creator, and the relief of men's estate."* * "Kut the greatest error of all the rest is the mistaking or misplacing of the last or farthest end of knowledge : — for men have entered into a desire of learning and knowledge, sometimes...
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The Works of Francis Bacon: Lord Chancellor of England, Volume 1

Francis Bacon - 1852 - 580 pages
...things , but to propound things sincerely, with more or less asseveration, as they stand in a man's owr* judgment proved more or less. Other errors there are...the last or furthest end of knowledge : for men have entered into a desire of learning and knowledge, sometimes upon a natural curiosity, and inquisitive...
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The British Controversialist and Impartial Inquirer, Volumes 3-4

Great Britain - 1852 - 978 pages
...well as ease to ibe reader, redistributed, and composed into different periods, thus, perhaps : — 1. The greatest error of all the rest is, the mistaking or misplacing of the last or farthest end of knowledge. 2. Men Appear to have entered into a desire of learning and knowledge, sometimes...
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The two books of Francis Bacon: of the proficience and advancement of ...

Francis Bacon (visct. St. Albans.) - 1852 - 238 pages
...profound interpreter or commenter, to be a sharp champion or defender, to be a methodical compoundcr or abridger, and so the patrimony of knowledge cometh to be sometimes improved, but seldom augmented. 11. But the greatest error of all the rest is the mistaking or misplacing of the last or furthest end...
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The London Lancet, Volume 2

Medicine - 1852 - 632 pages
...cultivated, however, in a proper spirit, alwajs remembering that the great Lord BACON has said,— " The greatest error of all the rest, is the mistaking or misplacing of the last or farthest end of knowledge: for men have entered into a desire of learning sai knowledge, sometimes...
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A Practical System of Rhetoric

Samuel Phillips Newman - English language - 1852 - 324 pages
...The following passage from his Advancement of Learning, is an example of Bacon's better style : — "But the greatest error of all the rest, is the mistaking or mis placing of the last or farthest end of knowledge ; for men have entered into a desire of learning...
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Philosophical works

Francis Bacon - Ethics - 1854 - 894 pages
...profound interpreter, or commentator ; to be a sharp champion or defender; to be a methodical com pounder my lord judge, " how came that in ?" "Why, if it please you, my lord, your name is Bacon, and mine is Bat the greatest error of all the rest, is the mistaking or misplacing of the last or farthest end...
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