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" ... more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered. No member of his speech but consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded where... "
The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England: A New Edition: - Page xxv
by Francis Bacon, Basil Montagu - 1834
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American Phrenological Journal and Life Illustrated, Volume 3

1841 - 632 pages
...look aside from him without loss. He commanded when he spoke ; and his judges were pleased or angry at his devotion. No man had their affections more...man that heard him was lest he should make an end. Cicero is said to be the only wit that the people of Rome had equaled in their empire. Ingenium par...
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The American Phrenological Journal and Miscellany, Volume 3

Phrenology - 1841 - 608 pages
...look aside from him without loss. He commanded when he spoke; and his judges were pleased or angry at his devotion. No man had their affections more...power. The fear of every man that heard him was lest ho should make an end. Cicero is said to be the only wit that the people of Rome had equaled in their...
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Works, Volume 2

Francis Bacon - 1841 - 612 pages
...lose, lie commanded where he spoke ; and had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion. No man bad their affections more in his power. The fear of every...man that heard him was lest he should make an end. 3 Take for Instance any of the Nervous Aphorisme, in the Novum Organum, and compare it with the sentences...
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England, Volume 2

Francis Bacon - 1841 - 624 pages
...spoke ; and had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion. No man had their aifections more in hie power. The fear of every man that heard him was lest he should make an end. 2 Take for instance any of the Nervous Aphorisms, in the Novum Organum, and compare it with the sentences...
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Critical and Historical Essays Contributed to the Edinburgh Review, Volume 2

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - English literature - 1843 - 520 pages
...cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke, and had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion. No man had their affections...man that heard him was lest he should make an end." From the mention which is made of judges, it would seem that Jonson had heard Bacon only at the bar....
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The Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature, Science, and Art, Volume 34

American literature - 1855 - 602 pages
...cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke, and had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion, No man had their affections more in his power. The fear of every man who heard him was lest he should make an end." In politics, however, he made a perilous attempt to...
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The Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature, Science, and Art, Volume 18

American literature - 1849 - 600 pages
...where he spoke, and had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion. No man had their afl'ections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard him was, lest he should make an end."f * Milton — Account of his own studies, t Ben Jonson's Works by Giflard, ix. 184. There is...
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Littell's Living Age, Volume 113

American periodicals - 1872 - 862 pages
...cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke, and had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion. No man had their affections more in his power. The fear of every тал that heard him was lett He thovld made an end." Clarendon's pages teem with proof that the period...
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The Lives of the Lord Chancellors and Keepers of the Great Seal of England ...

John Campbell Baron Campbell - Judges - 1845 - 672 pages
...cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke, and had his Judges angry and pleased at his devotion. No man had their affections more in his power. The fear of every man who heard him was lest he should make an end."* So intoxicated was Bacon with the success of his first...
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Bacon: His Writings, and His Philosophy, Volume 1

George Lillie Craik - Philosophers - 1846 - 730 pages
...cough, or look aside from him, without loss. He commanded where he spoke, and had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion. No man had their affections...every man that heard him was lest he should make an end."f In 1592, also, appeared Bacon's first publication, as far as is known : ' Certain Observations...
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