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" Made prostitute and profligate the Muse, Debased to each obscene and impious use, Whose harmony was first ordain'd above For tongues of angels, and for hymns of love... "
Poems: Now First Collected - Page 310
by Chandos Leigh - 1839 - 402 pages
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The English Poets, Volume 2

Thomas Humphry Ward - English poetry - 1901 - 532 pages
...renew: For all the blest fraternity of love Solemnized there thy birth, and kept thy holiday above O gracious God! how far have we Profaned thy heavenly gift of Poesy 1 Made prostitute and profligate the Muse, Debased to each obscene and impious use, Whose harmony was...
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Addison

William John Courthope - Authors, English - 1902 - 200 pages
...of true art, and had broken out in a fine passage in his Ode to the Memory of Mrs. Killigrew : " 0 gracious God ! how far have we Profaned thy heavenly gift of poesy 1 Made prostitute and profligate the Muse, Debased to each obscene and impious use I " 0 wretched we...
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The Masters of English Literature

Stephen Lucius Gwynn - Authors, English - 1904 - 452 pages
...poesy and painting." From this may be quoted the expression of personal remorse alluded to above : O gracious God ! how far have we Profaned thy heavenly gift of Poesy ! Made prostitute and profligate tho Muse, Debased to each obscene and impious use, Whose harmony was first ordained above, For tongues...
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The Masters of English Literature

Stephen Lucius Gwynn - Authors, English - 1904 - 458 pages
...poesy and painting." From this may be quoted the expression of personal remorse alluded to above : O gracious God ! how far have we Profaned thy heavenly gift of Poesy 1 Made prostitute and profligate the Muse, Debased to each obscene and impious use, Whose harmony was...
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Lives of the English Poets: Cowley-Dryden

Samuel Johnson - English poetry - 1905 - 530 pages
...own species) to scatter infection and destroy their posterity.' ADDISON, The Spectator, No. 166. * ' O gracious God ! how far have we Profaned thy heavenly' gift of poesy 1 Made prostitute and profligate the Muse, Debased to each obscene and impious use, Whose harmony was...
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An Introduction to English Literature

Henry Spackman Pancoast - English literature - 1907 - 718 pages
...rare burst of genuine feeling: 1 Preface to The Indian Emperor (1665). 1 Livee of the Poets, "Dryden." "O gracious God! how far have we Profaned thy heavenly gift of poesy I Made prostitute and profligate the Muse, Debased to each obscene and impious use, Whose harmony was...
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Dramatic History of the World

Kolachelam Rao S. - 1986 - 342 pages
...glad however that Dryden admits in a straightforward manner his guilt in the following lines : — " 0 gracious God ! how far have we Profaned thy heavenly...gift of poesy ! Made prostitute and profligate the muğe Debased to each obscene and impious use Whose harmony was first ordained above For tongues of...
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A First Book in English Literature

Henry Spackman Pancoast, Percy Van Dyke Shelly - English literature - 1910 - 564 pages
...conscience. In one of the most beautiful of his poems, he cries out in a rare burst of genuine feeling: "O gracious God! how far have we Profaned thy heavenly gift of poesy 1 " And towards the close of his life, he confesses with manly frankness, " I am sensible, as I ought...
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Publications of the Modern Language Association of America, Volume 21; Volume 28

Modern Language Association of America - Philology, Modern - 1913 - 818 pages
...burn'd." 4 That this was due to no merely passing mood is shown in his Elegy on Mrs. Ann Killigrew, — O gracious God! how far have we Profaned thy heavenly gift of poesy? 0 wretched we! why were we hurried down This lubrique and adulterate age, (Nay, added fat pollutions...
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Chaucer's Retractions

John Strong Perry Tatlock - 1913 - 22 pages
...burn'd." 4 That this was due to no merely passing mood is shown in his Elegy on Mrs. Ann Eilligrew, — O gracious God! how far have we Profaned thy heavenly gift of poesy? 0 wretched we! why were we hurried down This lubrique and adulterate age, (Nay, added fat pollutions...
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