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" Why, look you now, how unworthy a thing you make of me ! You would play upon me ; you would seem to know my stops ; you would pluck out the heart of my mystery ; you would sound me from my lowest note to the top of my compass : and there is much music,... "
Bacon and Shake-speare Parallelisms - Page 255
by Edwin Reed - 1902 - 441 pages
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Eclectic Magazine, and Monthly Edition of the Living Age, Volume 24

John Holmes Agnew, Walter Hilliard Bidwell - American periodicals - 1851 - 606 pages
...and shifting to every breath, to say to his critics, as he said to Rosincrantz and Guildenstern, " You would play upon me ; you would seem to know my...sound me from the lowest note to the top of my compass ; and there is much music, excellent voice, in this little organ, yet cannot you m-ike it speak." We...
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The New American Speaker: A Collection of Oratorical and Dramatical Pieces ...

John Celivergos Zachos - Elocution - 1851 - 570 pages
...the stops. Ouil. But these cannot I command to any utterance of harmony ; I have not the skill. flam. Why, look you now, how unworthy a thing you make of...stops ; you would pluck out the heart of my mystery ; yon would sound me from my lowest note to the top of my compass : and there is much music, excellent...
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William Shakspeare's Complete Works, Dramatic and Poetic, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1852 - 562 pages
...the stops. Gi/i/. But these cannot I command to any utterance of harmony ; I have not the skill. Ham. , ڑ- my lowest note to the top of my compass : and there is much music, excellent voice, in this linlc organ...
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Hamlet: The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2001 - 304 pages
...Ham. Why looke you now, how vnworthy a thing you make of me: you would play vpon mee; you would seeme to know my stops: you would pluck out the heart of my Mysterie; you would sound mee from my lowest Note, to the top of my Compasse: and there is much Musicke,...
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 23

Kenneth Muir - Drama - 2002 - 216 pages
...Guildenstern. But these cannot I commend to any utterance of harmony; I have not the skill. Hamlet. Why, look you now, how unworthy a thing you make of...out the heart of my mystery, you would sound me from my lowest note to the top of my compass, and there is much music, excellent voice, in this little organ,...
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The Time is Out of Joint: Shakespeare as Philosopher of History

Agnes Heller - Fiction - 2002 - 390 pages
...metaphor of the musical instrument for his innermost soul. Hamlet says to Rosencrantz and Guildenstern: "Why, look you now, how unworthy a thing you make...out the heart of my mystery, you would sound me from my lowest note to the top of my compass; and there is much music, excellent voice in this little organ...
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Amleto

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1995 - 340 pages
...GU1LUENSTERN But ihese cannnt I cotnmand to any utterance of harmony. I have not the skill. "o HAMLET Why, look you now, how unworthy a thing you make of...out the heart of my mystery. You would sound me from my lowest note to the top of my compass. And there is mudi music, excellent voice, in this little organ....
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The Sound of Shakespeare

Wes Folkerth - Drama - 2002 - 168 pages
...the same scene he accuses Rosencrantz and Guildenstern of spying on him, employing the same metaphor: You would play upon me, you would seem to know my...me from the lowest note to the top of my compass; and there is much music, excellent voice, in this litde organ, yet cannot you make it speak. 'Sblood,...
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Promises, Promises: Essays on Psychoanalysis and Literature

Adam Phillips - Psychology - 2009 - 398 pages
...true'. And by the same token, Hamlet himself predicts what critics of the play will want to do to him; 'Why look you now, how unworthy a thing you make of...stops; you would pluck out the heart of my mystery . . .' (Act III, scene 2, 386). Hamlet says this to Guildenstern, as though there was a heart, a centre,...
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The Dubious Spectacle: Extremities of Theater, 1976-2000

Herbert Blau - Drama - 2002 - 375 pages
...grieving. Lowers hands as she reaches the other side of the circle, turns and speaks into the space: JUL: Why, look you now, how unworthy a thing you make of...stops, you would pluck out the heart of my mystery. DEN: Seems, madam? Nay, it is. I know not "seems. " Julie's tone changes again, a green thought in...
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