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2204.13

THE

HISTORY OF SCOTLAND,

FROM THE

INVASION OF THE ROMANS TILL THE UNION WITH

ENGLAND:

WITH A SUPPLEMENTARY NARRATIVE OF

THE REBELLION IN 1715 AND 1745:

Together with

SKETCHES ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE NATIONAL INSTITUTIONS OF

The Scots,

THE PROGRESS OF EDUCATION AND LITERATURE,
AGRICULTURE, MANUFACTURES,

AND COMMERCE.

With Sir Hundred Questions as Exercises.

BY

DANIEL MACINTOSH,

THE SECOND EDITION, REVISED AND ENLARGED.

London:

PRINTED FOR LONGMAN, HURST, REES, ORME, AND Brown,
WAUGH AND INNES, EDINBURGH; AND J. H. BAXTER, Dundee.

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THE utility of historical abridgments is generally acknowledged. When judiciously executed, they comprehend in a small space all that is necessary to be remembered, or is essentially useful. For the generality of readers, who think a moderate share of history sufficient for the purposes of life, and for young persons engaged in laying a foundation for future study, the series of the Scottish histories is too voluminous.

Of the few abridgments of our history that have hitherto appeared, it might be considered invidious to remark, that they possess little merit or reputation: But candour will admit, that they are either mere epitomes of larger works, or that they consist of incidents injudiciously selected, unskilfully arranged, and, in many instances, of doubtful authenticity. These considerations have suggested the compilation of the work now submitted to the public.

So far as the limits of his abridgment would admit, the compiler has endeavoured to exhibit a brief and comprehensive outline of the history of Scotland, with an accurate and consecutive view of its leading events; to trace their causes and consequences; and to combine with the relation of facts a view of the policy of the actors.

The application of science and philosophy to the study of facts, is philosophy teaching by examples: History therefore becomes the school of instruction, by illustrating the precepts of philosophy and virtue.

The compiler has attempted to mark the advancement of knowledge, by tracing the progress of the arts and sciences, religion, laws, government, and manners,—in occasional digressions and in the Supplementary Sketches. The history of Scottish literature is important and interesting, and forms a material part of the Supplement.

Notwithstanding much labour and care, the compiler is sensible that his history has many defects,-unavoidable

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