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findeth a brier or an impediment, which catcheth or stoppeth.

"Melior est finis orationis quam principium." Here is taxed the vanity of formal speakers, that study more about prefaces and inducements, than upon the conclusions and issues of speech.

"Qui cognoscit in judicio faciem, non bene facit; "iste et pro bucella panis deseret veritatem." Here is noted, that a judge were better be a briber than a respecter of persons; for a corrupt judge offendeth not so highly as a facile.

"Vir pauper calumnians pauperes similis est “ imbri vehementi, in quo paratur fames." Here is expressed the extremity of necessitous extortions, figured in the ancient fable of the full and hungry horse-leech.

"Fons turbatus pede, et vena corrupta, est jus"tus cadens coram impio." Here is noted, that one judical and exemplar iniquity in the face of the world, doth trouble the fountains of justice more than many particular injuries passed over by connivance.

"Qui subtrahit aliquid a patre et a matre, et ❝ dicit hoc non esse peccatum, particeps est homicidii.” Here is noted, that whereas men in wronging their best friends use to extenuate their fault, as if they might presume or be bold upon them, it doth contrariwise indeed aggravate their fault, and turneth it from injury to impiety.

"Noli esse amicus homini iracundo, nec ambulato "cum homine furioso." Here caution is given, that

in the election of our friends we do principally avoid those which are impatient, as those that will espouse us to many factions and quarrels.

"Qui conturbat domum suam, possidebit ven"tum." Here is noted, that in domestical separations and breaches men do promise to themselves quieting of their mind and contentment; but still they are deceived of their expectation, and it turneth to wind.

"Filius sapiens lætificat patrem filius vero "stultus mæstitia est matri suæ." Here is distinguished, that fathers have most comfort of the good proof of their sons; but mothers have most discomfort of their ill proof, because women have little discerning of virtue, but of fortune.

"Qui celat delictum, quærit amicitiam; sed qui "altero sermone repetit, separat fœderatos." Here caution is given, that reconcilement is better managed by an amnesty, and passing over that which is past, than by apologies and excusations.

"In omni opere bono erit abundantia; ubi au"tem verba sunt plurima, ibi frequenter egestas." Here is noted, that words and discourse abound most where there is idleness and want.

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"Primus in sua causa justus; sed venit altera pars, et inquirit in eum." Here is observed, that in all causes the first tale possesseth much; in such sort, that the prejudice thereby wrought will be hardly removed, except some abuse or falsity in the information be detected.

"Verba bilinguis quasi simplicia, et ipsa perve

"niunt ad interiora ventris. Here is stingrished... that flattery and insinuation, which seemeti set and artificial, sinketh not far; but that enterech deep which hath shew of nature, berry, and simplicity.

"Qui erudit derisorem, ipse si injuriam fact: "et qui arguit impium, sibi maculam generat Here caution is given how we tender reprehension to arrogant and scornful natures, whose manner is to esteem it for contumely, and accordingly t return it.

"Da sapienti occasionem, et addetur ei sapien"tia.” Here is distinguished the wisdom brought into habit, and that which is but verbal, and swimming only in conceit; for the one upon occasico presented is quickened and redoubled, the other is amazed and confused.

"Quomodo in aquis resplendent vultus proepi❝cientium, sic corda hominum manifesta sunt pro"dentibus." Here the mind of a wise man is compared to a glass, wherein the images of al diversity of natures and customs are represented; from which representation proceedeth that appcation,

"Qui sapit, innumeris moribus aptus erit.”

Thus have I staid somewhat longer upon these sentences politic of Solomon than is agreeable to the proportion of an example; led with a desire to give authority to this part of knowledge, which I noted as deficient, by so excellent a precedent; and have also attended them with brief observations,

many times love not to have those they employ too deep or too sufficient, but ready and diligent.

"Vidi cunctos viventes qui ambulant sub sole, "cum adolescente secundo qui consurgit pro eo." Here is expressed that which was noted by Sylla first, and after him by Tiberius: "Plures ado"rant solem orientem quam occidentem vel me"ridianum."

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"Si spiritus potestatem habentis ascenderit super te, locum tuum ne dimiseris; quia curatio "faciet cessare peccata maxima.” Here caution is given, that upon displeasure, retiring is of all courses the unfittest; for a man leaveth things at worst, and depriveth himself of means to make them better.

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Erat civitas parva, et pauci in ea viri: venit "contra eam rex magnus, et vadavit eam, intruxitque munitiones per gyrum, et perfecta est "obsidio: inventusque est in ea vir pauper et sapiens, et liberavit eam per sapientiam suam; "et nullus deinceps recordatus est hominis illius pauperis." Here the corruption of states is set forth, that esteem not virtue or merit longer than they have use of it.

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"Mollis responsio frangit iram." Here is noted that silence or rough answer exasperateth; but an answer present and temperate pacifieth.

"Iter pigrorum quasi sepes spinarum." Here is lively represented how laborious sloth proveth in the end; for when things are deferred till the last instant, and nothing prepared beforehand, every step

findeth a brier or an impediment, which catcheth or stoppeth.

"Melior est finis orationis quam principium." Here is taxed the vanity of formal speakers, that study more about prefaces and inducements, than the conclusions and issues of speech.

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Qui cognoscit in judicio faciem, non bene facit; "iste et pro bucella panis deseret veritatem." Here is noted, that a judge were better be a briber than a respecter of persons; for a corrupt judge offendeth not so highly as a facile.

"Vir pauper calumnians pauperes similis est " imbri vehementi, in quo paratur fames." Here is expressed the extremity of necessitous extortions, figured in the ancient fable of the full and hungry horse-leech.

"Fons turbatus pede, et vena corrupta, est jus"tus cadens coram impio." Here is noted, that one judical and exemplar iniquity in the face of the world, doth trouble the fountains of justice more than many particular injuries passed over by connivance.

"Qui subtrahit aliquid a patre et a matre, et "dicit hoc non esse peccatum, particeps est homicidii.” Here is noted, that whereas men in wronging their best friends use to extenuate their fault, as if they might presume or be bold upon them, it doth contrariwise indeed aggravate their fault, and turneth it from injury to impiety.

"Noli esse amicus homini iracundo, nec ambulato "cum homine furioso." Here caution is given, that

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