Parliamentary Logick: To which are Subjoined Two Speeches, Delivered in the House of Commons of Ireland, and Other Pieces

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C. and R. Baldwin, 1808 - Corn laws (Great Britain) - 253 pages

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Page 26 - ... men began to hunt more after words than matter ; and more after the choiceness of the phrase, and the round and clean composition of the sentence, and the sweet falling of the clauses, and the varying and illustration of their works with tropes and figures, than after the weight of matter, worth of subject, soundness of argument, life of invention, or depth of judgment.
Page 98 - When they conceived a subject, they first made a variety of sketches ; then a finished drawing of the whole ; after that a more correct drawing of every separate part...
Page xix - Hamilton 1" who spoke for the first time, and was at once perfection: his speech was set, and full of antithesis, but those antitheses were full of argument: indeed his speech was the most argumentative of the whole day; and he broke through the regularity of his own composition, answered other people, and fell into his own track again with the greatest ease. His figure is advantageous, his voice strong and clear, his manner spirited, and the whole with the ease of an established speaker.
Page 103 - They have introduced a Privy Council ravishing at once the spheres of all ancient government, imprisoning us without bail or bond. They have taken from us...
Page 67 - ... a man of dangerous principles and designs, or has been seen more or less frequently in his company, or has pro* On the subject of personalities of the vituperative kind, the following are the instructions given by Gerard Hamilton: they contain all he says upon the subject. I. 31, 367, p. 67 — " It is an artifice to be used (but if used by others, to be detected,) to begin some personality, or to throw in something that may bring on a personal altercation, and draw off the attention of the House...
Page xxx - Lord Bute found no resource of dependence or security in the proud, imposing superiority of Lord Chatham's abilities, the shrewd, inflexible judgment of Mr. Grenville, nor in the mild but determined integrity of Lord Rockingham.
Page xvi - This seems to have given him his first hold of the public attention ; for Waller remarked, "that he broke out like the Irish rebellion, threescore thousand strong, when nobody was aware, or in the least suspected it ;" an observation which could have had no propriety, had his poetical abilities been known before.
Page 147 - Irish exactions, extorted by the chieftains and tanists by colour of their barbarous seigniory, were almost as grievous a burthen as the other, namely, cosherings, which were visitations and progresses made by the lord and his followers among his tenants...
Page xxiv - ... it was necessary for him to support the measures of administration ; and accordingly in 1761 and 1762, he made five speeches on various occasions, which fully gratified the expectations of his auditors. Mr. Hamilton continued secretary to the succeeding lord lieutenant, Hugh earl of Northumberland, in 1763, but it is believed his exertions in that session were less splendid and less frequent ; and before it concluded, on some disgust he resigned his office. On his return to England, and for a...
Page 199 - ... station in which I am placed, to the dignity of which the emoluments are, as you represent them, inadequate. I shall transmit therefore the sense of the House of Commons, that the augmentation which your generosity has proposed, may...

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