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THE

CRITICAL REVIEW:

OR,

ANNALS

от

LITERATURE.

SERIES THE FOURTH.

VOL. VI.

εἰ δὲ μὴ λέγω φίλα
Οὐχ ήδομαι, τὸ δ ̓ ὀρθὸν ἐξείρηχε δριά

Soph. Trachin.

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR THE PROPRIETORS,
By THOMAS BLUCK, 2, Paternoster Row;

Published by G. & S. Robinson, Paternoster Row;

SOLD BY J. DEIGHTON, CAMBRIDGE; J. PARKER, AND J. COOKE,
OXFORD; WILSON AND SONS, YORK; A. CONSTABLE AND CO.
EDINBURGH; AND M. KEENE, DUBLIN.

HOLD ALSO BY MESSRS. BOSSANGE AND MASSON, PARIS; PERTHES
AND BESTER, HAMBURGH; DELACHEAUX, AMSTERDAM ; I. E.
HITZIG, BERLIN: GERH, FLEISCHER, LEIPZIG; C. J. G. HART-
MAN, RIGA; DITTMAR, ST. PETERSBURGH; AND BY MOST RE-
SPECTABLE BOOKSELLERS THROUGHOUT EUROPE AND AME-

BICA.

1814.

ADDRESS.

CRITICISM is the touchstone of Genius; and, impartially administered, gives a noble emulation to the pursuits of literature. To this end, reviews have been instituted; and, in that department, the CRITICAL REVIEW has been aecustomed to shine with peculiar splendour.

Edited by Smollet, and compiled by gentlemen deeply read in literature-skilled in the sciences--and familiar with the fine arts-it sought what it obtained, universal patronage. Independently, however, of these considerations, this journal is valuable from its antiquity; inasmuch, as it is an established classic record, to which, more than to its compeers, our best authors make frequent reference. But, with the decay of its original proprietors, the CRITICAL REVIEW has suffered, in turn, a partial dissolution. In its passage throughout four several series, incidental to changes of proprietors, and to the revolutions of taste, of manners, and of politics, it has experienced much diminution of fame. Latterly, indeed, to an alarming extent: for it was, prior to January last, almost exclusively devoted to the partial review of books, either issuing from one press, or influenced by one interest.

In this state of natural decline, it was purchased, and has been wholly edited, for the last seven months, by an individual-not, certainly, in the presumption that his solitary efforts could restore the CRITICAL REVIEW to its former well earned reputation: but, with a feeble hope of keeping the bright spark alive, till an association of talent could be formed to rekindle its wonted brilliancy.

That grand object being, now, happily accomplished, the present proprietors, six in number, each classically qualified, have the honour to announce to the public, that from the 1st of January 1815, the CRITICAL REVIEW will commence its FIFTH SERIES under the following regulations.-

That the Editor will analyze the works before him; uof dissect their authors. That he will, with mild and salutary correction, amend--not wound by fastidious severity. That he will observe the strictest impartiality, for the Proprietors are uninfluenced, on all subjects; and, that he will devote his every energy to his profession.

The CRITICAL REVIEW will continue to be published on the first day of every month, and will comprise two volumes within the year. With each volume will be published an Appendix. History, poetry, travels, the belles-lettres generally, and the arts and sciences will, invariably, form the prominent features of criticism; and, as music has become a study of general cultivation among our higher orders of society, the editor will give a monthly critique, either of eminent composers, or of esteemed performers.

The stage will be another, but occasional, consideration; and the editor will, as circumstances may demand, review the drama, with strictures on the respective claims of popular actors.

In the Appendix, he will refer to momentous causes in our courts of judicature....to foreign literature....to foreign music....and the law process of the foreign States of Europe: adding thereto, a list of foreign books as published within the last six months. Political subjects will, also, occasionally occupy their page, as will Biographical Sketches of eminent deccased authors.

With this plain statement, unornamented by sophistry, the proprietors close their brief Address; but, as the CRITICAL REVIEW, has heretofore been honoured with a circulation almost unprecedented, and a sterling reputation founded in public confidence, they aspire to hope, that, as they be found, from experience, to merit public approba→ tion, their labours may be crowned with public applause.

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London:-Published by Messrs. G. & S Robinson, 25, Paternoster Row, whom all communications for the Editor must be sent, as well as Books for Re. view and announcements of new Works as they issue from the press. The Critical Review is now regularly established on the continent, and may be procured from the following Publishers. Messrs. Bossauge and Masson, Paris; Perthes and Besser, Hamburgh; Delacheaux, Amsterdam; 1. E. Hitzig, Berlin; Gerh. Fleischer, Leipzig; C. J. G. Hartman, Riga; Dittmar, St. Petersburgh; and from most respectable foreigu Booksellers throughout Europe and America.

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ART. I.-Thoughts on various Charitable, and other Important Institutions; and, on the best mode of conducting them; to which is subjoined, an Address to the friends of the Rising Generation. By Catharine Cappe. Dedicated, by permission, to William Wilberforce, Esq. Octavo. pp. 110. 3s. Longman and Co., &c. 1814.

TAS pamphlet, originating in the noblest, and best propensities of the human heart, is offered to the public under the avowed sanction of the moral, the benevolent, and the pious, Mr. Wilberforce; a gentleman, whose strenuous endeavours in rooting out slavery from the cor ruption of our constitution, will ever be remembered by a grateful people, proud in the freedom of their laws, and zealous to extend the blessings they enjoy to suffering humanity.

. We must, notwithstanding, confess, however odious the term of slavery, and however repugnant the reality to our feelings as Britons, it is our belief, that Mr. Wilberforce would have drawn a less animated picture of human wretch edness, had he been personally acquainted with the real comforts and comparative independence of a well disposed negro family in our colonies.

We do not venture this assertion in support of slavery; on the contrary, we rejoice with our fellow citizens, in its abolition from our code; but we do it with a hope to rescue, from undeserved obloquy, the humanity and respectability, in à general sense, of our West India planters. Personal CRIT. REV. Vol. 6, July, 1814.

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