The Letters and the Life of Francis Bacon Including All His Occasional Works: Namely Letters, Speeches, Tracts, State Papers, Memorials, Devices and All Authentic Writings Not Already Printed Among His Philosophical, Literary, Or Professional Works

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Longman, Green, Longman, and Roberts, 1861 - English literature

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Page 269 - Digest me no digesting (said the Earl) ; for the Attorneyship is that I must have for Francis Bacon ; and in that I will spend my uttermost credit, friendship, and authority against whomsoever, and that whosoever went about to procure it to others, that it should cost both the mediators and the suitors the setting on before they came by it. And this be you assured of, Sir Robert, quoth the Earl, for now do I fully declare myself ; and for your own part, Sir Robert, I do think much and strange both...
Page 108 - I wax now somewhat ancient; one and thirty years is a great deal of sand in the hour-glass. My health, I thank God, I find confirmed; and I do not fear that action shall impair it; because I account my ordinary course of study and meditation to be more painful than most parts of action are. I ever...
Page 74 - Wherefore, my beloved brethren, let every man be swift to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath...
Page 387 - Netherlands, and about the end of the sixteenth or the beginning of the seventeenth century was brought thence to England by protestant refugees. Lewis Roberts, in ' The Treasure of Traffic,' published in 1641, makes the earliest mention extant of the manufacture in England.
Page 371 - He bade me take no care for that, and pressed it : whereupon I said, " My lord, I see I must be your " homager, and hold land of your gift ; but do you " know the manner of doing homage in law? Always " it is with a saving of his faith to the king and his " other lords ; and therefore, my lord, said I, I can be " no more yours than I was, and it must be with the " ancient savings: and if 1 grow to be a rich man, " you will give me leave to give it back again to some " of your unrewarded followers.
Page 108 - I commend myself unto your Lordship. I wax now somewhat ancient : one and thirty years is a great deal of sand in the hour-glass. My health, I thank God, I find confirmed ; and I do not fear that action shall impair it, because I account my ordinary course of study and meditation to be more painful than most parts of action are.
Page 178 - ... her majesty not liking to make windows into men's hearts and secret thoughts, except the abundance of them did overflow into overt and express acts and affirmations, tempered her law so, as it restraineth only manifest disobedience in impugning and impeaching advisedly and ambitiously her majesty's supreme power, and maintaining and extolling a foreign jurisdiction.
Page 78 - Veneri immolant suem, they seek to gratify them with that which they most dislike : for I have great reason to satisfy myself touching the judgment of my lords the bishops in this matter, by that which was written by one of them, which I mentioned before with honour. Nevertheless I note, there is not an indifferent hand carried towards these pamphlets as they deserve ; for the one sort flieth in the dark, and the other is uttered openly ; wherein I might advise that side out of a wise writer, who...
Page 76 - Indeed, bitter and earnest writing must not hastily be condemned ; for men cannot contend coldly, and without affection, about things which they hold dear and precious. A politic man may write from his brain without touch and sense of his heart ; as in a speculation that appertaineth not unto him ; but a feeling Christian will express in his words a character of zeal or love.
Page 75 - ... religion hath parts which belong to eternity, and parts which pertain to time : and if we did but know the virtue of silence and slowness to speak, commended by St. James, our controversies of themselves would close up and grow together...

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