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Oxford University Press, 1892 - Electronic journals

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Page 200 - For the stone shall cry out of the wall, and the beam out of the timber shall answer it.
Page 109 - Look how the Lion of the sea lifts up his ancient crown, And underneath his deadly paw treads the gay lilies down.
Page 32 - Ha, ha! keep time: how sour sweet music is, When time is broke and no proportion kept! So is it in the music of men's lives.
Page 267 - That never set a squadron in the field, Nor the division of a battle knows More than a spinster...
Page 290 - A TABLE OF KINDRED AND AFFINITY, WHEREIN WHOSOEVER ARE RELATED ARE FORBIDDEN IN SCRIPTURE AND OUR LAWS TO MARRY TOGETHER A man may not marry his: 1 . Grandmother 2.
Page 151 - The savory pulp they chew, and in the rind Still, as they thirsted, scoop the brimming stream; Nor gentle purpose nor endearing smiles Wanted, nor youthful dalliance, as beseems Fair couple, linked in happy nuptial league, Alone as they. About them frisking played All beasts of the...
Page 169 - The sire turns o'er, wi' patriarchal grace, The big ha' Bible, ance his father's pride. His bonnet rev'rently is laid aside, His lyart haffets wearing thin an' bare ; Those strains that once did sweet in Zion glide, He wales a portion with judicious care ; And " Let us worship God !
Page 197 - Come, brightly wafting through the gloom Our peace-branch from above ? Then sorrow, touched by Thee, grows bright With more than rapture's ray ; As darkness shows us worlds of light We never saw by day ; WEEP NOT FOR THOSE.
Page 175 - Darlington, whom I saw at my mother's in my infancy, and whom I remember by being terrified at her enormous figure, was as corpulent and ample as the duchess was long and emaciated. Two fierce black eyes, large and rolling beneath two lofty arched eye-brows, two acres of cheeks spread with crimson, an ocean of neck that overflowed and was not distinguished from the lower part of her body, and no part restrained by stays — no wonder that a child dreaded such an ogress...
Page 57 - By these to sing of cleanly wantonness; I sing of dews, of rains, and piece by piece Of balm, of oil, of spice and ambergris; I sing of times trans-shifting, and I write How roses first came red and lilies white; I write of groves, of twilights, and I sing The Court of Mab, and of the Fairy King; I write of hell ; I sing (and ever shall) Of heaven, and hope to have it after all.

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