Bankrupt Stories

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John Allen, 1843 - American fiction - 381 pages

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Page 78 - I am afraid my uncle will think himself justified by them on this occasion, when he asserts, that it is one of the most difficult things in the world to put a woman right, when she sets out wrong.
Page 330 - Entreat me not to leave thee, or to return from following after thee; for whither thou goest, I will go; and where thou lodgest, I will lodge. Thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God. Where thou diest, will I die, and there will I be buried. The Lord do so to me, and more also, if aught but death part thee and me.
Page 245 - GOD the Father, God the Son, God the Holy Ghost, bless, preserve, and keep you; the Lord mercifully with his favour look upon you; and so fill you with all spiritual benediction and grace, that ye may so live together in this life, that in the world to come ye may have life everlasting.
Page 245 - God the Father, God the Son, God the Holy Ghost, bless, preserve, and keep you; the Lord mercifully with His favor look upon you, and fill you with all spiritual benediction and grace; that ye may so live together in this life, that in the world to come ye may have life everlasting. Amen.
Page 16 - Fiction corrects it, and presents us with the fates and fortunes of persons rewarded or punished according to merit. And as real history disgusts us with a familiar and constant similitude of things, Fiction relieves us by unexpected turns and changes, and thus not only delights, but inculcates morality and nobleness of soul. It raises the mind by accommodating the images of things to our desires, and not like history and reason, subjecting the mind to things.
Page 16 - Fiction strongly shows that a greater variety of things, a more perfect order, a more beautiful variety, than can any where be found in nature, is pleasing to the mind. And as real history gives us not the success of things according to the deserts of vice and virtue, Fiction corrects it, and presents us with the fates and fortunes of persons rewarded or punished according to merit.
Page 72 - Our hero could think of no argument to oppose to the specious reas soning of the young lawyers; and although he felt it was wrong, yet as he had been accustomed to look upon them as his superiors, he thought they must be better judges than himself of what was right and proper. Beside, he could not bear the idea of sharing in their money, while he incurred no part of the risk of obtaining it; although he always shared his own allowance with the two brothers, without expecting any thing in return....
Page 2 - Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1853, BY JS REDFIELD, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States, in and for the Southern District of New York.
Page 78 - Nothing feeds grief like sympathy, and these few words had such an effect on Mrs. Bates, that she redoubled her shrieks, and gave vent to her feelings in such piercing tones, that Mr. Tuck was compelled to put his hands to his ears. ' Do n't let that woman come near me !' he exclaimed ; ' take her away, take her away !' ' Give me my dear husband ! — give me back my husband !' still shrieked the lady, when in walked Mr. Bates, with his face washed clean, and his coat buttoned up to his chin, to...
Page 77 - it is a very strange world that we live in. I know I have been robbed of my pocket-book, and I am very certain that my head book-keeper lay here a moment ago, with his throat cut; but what has become of him, is more than I can say." As Mr. Bates' house was but a few steps from the countingroom, some humane individual, who had heard an exaggerated account of the disaster, had run there in great haste, and informed Mrs. Bates that her husband had been murdered by his employer, Mr. Tuck. As the...

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