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phur, mercury; of bodies heavy and light; of sympathy and antipathy. The first three, in the order I have here placed them, he prosecuted at some length; and in a manner that shews with what a happy sagacity he could apply his own rules to the interpretation of nature. The wonder is, that other inquirers since his time have done so little towards perfecting the two first mentioned, things of so great concern to human society, and to every individual. As to the three last, we have only a short introduction to each: death having prevented him from writing any thing on the subjects themselves. Such is our condition here: whoever is capable of planning useful and extensive schemes dies always too soon for mankind, even in the most advanced age.

5. Of the fifth part he has left nothing but the Anticipatitle and scheme. It was indeed to be only a tem

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philos. porary structure, raised with such materials as he secundæ, himself had either invented, or tried, or improved ; not according to the due form of genuine induction, but by the same common use of the understanding that others had employed. And this was to remain no longer than till he had raised,

6. The sixth and sublimest part of this grand In- Philosostauration, to which all the precedent are merely

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prima, sive subservient; a philosophy purely axiomatical and sci- acuiva. entific; flowing from that just, castigated, genuine manner of inquiry, which the author first invented and applied. But this he despaired of being able to accomplish ; and the learned of all countries from his days have been only labouring some separate or lesser parts of this amazing edifice, which ages to come may not see finished according to the model left them by this one man.

Such, and so unlimited were his views for the universal advancement of science; the noble aim to which he directed all his philosophic labours. What Cæsar said, in compliment, to Tully, may, with strict justice, be applied to him ; that it was more glorious to have extended the limits of human wit, than to have enlarged the bounds of the Roman world. Sir

Francis Bacon really did so; a truth acknowledged not only by the greatest private names in Europe, but by all the public societies of its most civilized nations. France, Italy, Germany, Britain, I may add even Russia, have taken him for their leader, and submitted to be governed by his institutions. The empire he has erected in the learned world is as universal as the free use of reason: and one must continue, till the other is no more.

PHILOSOPHICAL WORKS.

THE

TWO BOOKS

OF

FRANCIS BACON,

OP TAE

PROFICIENCE AND ADVANCEMENT

OP

LEARNING,

DIVINE AND HUMAN.

To the King

!*

THE

FIRST BOOK

OF

FRANCIS BACON :

OF THE

PROFICIENCE AND ADVANCEMENT OF

LEARNING,

DIVINE AND HUMAN.

To the king.

THERE were under the law, excellent king, both daily sacrifices, and freewill offerings : the one proceeding upon ordinary observance, the other upon a devout chearfulness : in like manner there belongeth to kings from their servants, both tribute of duty, and presents of affection. In the former of these, I hope I shall not live to be wanting, according to my most humble duty, and the good pleasure of your majesty's employments: for the latter, I thought it more respective to make choice of some oblation, which might rather refer to the propriety and excellency of your individual person, than to the business of your crown and state.

Wherefore representing your majesty many times unto my mind, and beholding you not with the inquisitive eye of presumption, to discover that which the Scripture telleth me is inscrutable, but with the observant eye of duty and admiration : leaving aside the other parts of your virtue and fortune, I have been touched, yea, and possessed with an extreme wonder at those your virtues and faculties, which the philosophers call intellectual: the largeness of your capacity, the faithfulness of your memory, the swift

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