Memoirs of the Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society

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Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society., 1819 - Science

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Page 29 - Manchester, published an inquiry into the nature and cause of that swelling in one or both of the lower extremities, which sometimes happens to lying-in women...
Page 243 - This grew speedily to an excess ; for men began to hunt more after words than matter, and more after the choiceness of the phrase, and the round and clean composition of the sentence, and the sweet falling of the clauses, and the varying and illustration of their works with tropes and figures, than after the weight of matter, worth of subject, soundness of argument, life of invention, or depth of judgment.
Page 243 - ... affectionate study of eloquence and copie of speech, which then began to flourish. This grew speedily to an excess; for men began to hunt more after words than matter; and more after the choiceness of the phrase, and the round and clean composition of the sentence, and the sweet falling of the clauses...
Page 268 - Transactions of a Society for the Improvement of Medical and Chirurgical Knowledge.
Page 335 - It will be perceived that all these processes are nothing more than preparatory measures for the operation which is to succeed, viz. that of TINNING. For this purpose an iron pot is nearly filled with a mixture of block and grain tin, in a melted state ; and a quantity of tallow or grease, sufficient, when melted, to cover the fluid metal, to the thickness of four inches, is put to it. However, as some...
Page 336 - When the tin-pot has been charged in the way above mentioned, the metal is heated from a fire-place underneath it, and by flues which go round the pot, until it is as hot as it can be made without actually inflaming the grease which swims upon its surface. The use of the grease is to preserve the tin from the action of the atmosphere, and consequently to prevent it from oxidating. By melting a little tin or lead in an iron ladle, and, when the dross is skimmed off, putting a morsel of tallow upon...
Page 351 - PATENT was trumpt up, and the patentee was countenanced by some persons of quality — and what, with the patent being in our way, and the richest of our partners being afraid to offend great men in power, who had their eye upon us, it caused the thing to cool, and the making thereof was neither proceeded in by us, nor possibly could be by him that had the patent ; because neither he that hath the patent, nor those that have countenanced him, can make one plate fit for use...
Page 197 - Considerations relative to the Nature of Wool, Silk, and Cotton as Objects of the Art of Dyeing; on the various Preparations and Mordants requisite for these different Sabstances ; and on the Nature and Properties of Colouring Matter.
Page 465 - The cause of rain, therefore, is now, I consider, no longer an object of doubt. If two masses of air of unequal temperatures, by the ordinary currents of the winds, are intermixed, when saturated with vapour, a precipitation ensues. If the masses are under saturation, then less precipitation takes place, or none at all, according to the degree. Also the warmer the air, the greater is the quantity of vapour precipitated in like circumstances...
Page 181 - Society for that share of indulgence, which he may reasonably claim, in speaking of one to whom he was so nearly allied. THE late Mr. Henry was descended from a respectable family, which for several generations, had resided in the county of Antrim. His paternal grandfather commanded a company of foot in the service of James the Second ; and during the disturbed times, which, in Ireland, succeeded the revolution, was shot by an assassin in his own garden. The father of Mr. Henry, then an infant scarcely...

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