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Subject, adj. Liable: p. 259, l. 13.

'A widow, husbandless, subject to fears.'

Shakespeare, K. John, iii. 1. 14. Subject, sb. Used as a collective noun for the people: p. 55, l. 33, as in

Hamlet, i. I. 72.

Suborn, v. t. Like the Lat. subornare, to furnish, equip: p. 187, I. 14. Subsistence, sb. Substance: p. 44, 1. 22.

Substantive, adj. Substantial: p. 106, 1. 8.

Subtility, sb. Subtilty; the old form of spelling, which Bacon most frequently adopts; from Lat. subtilitas: p. 32, l. 10; &c.

Success, sb. The result or issue of an action, good or bad: p. 101, 1. 31: P. 135, 1. 4. It was formerly used with some qualifying adjective. See Josh. i. 8.

Such one. Such, such a one: p. 253, 1. 15.

Succours. Plural for singular: p. 28, 1. 18.

Suddenly, adv. Quickly, hastily: p. 184, l. 16; p. 234, 1. 8.
Muse not that I thus suddenly proceed.'

Shakespeare, Two Gent. of Ver. i. 3. 64.

'And suddenly resolve me in my suit.'

Id. Love's Lab. Lost, ii. 2. IIO.

Suffice, v.i. To be competent: p. 172, 1. 23.

Sufficient, adj. Competent, able: p. 79, l. 18; p. 93, l. 32; p. 221, Sufficient men men of capacity, ability.

1. 25.

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Sufficiency, sb. Ability, capacity: p. 216, 1. 29. See 2 Cor. iii. 5. Summary, adj. Chief, most important: p. 6, 1. 30; p. 19, 1. 30; p. 45,

1. 31.

Suppeditation, sb. Assistance: p. 206, 1. 2.

Supply, v. t. To assist: p. 76, l. 16.

Suppose, v. t. To imagine: p. 267, l. 19.

Supposed, adj. Fictitious, imaginary: p. 45, 1. 5. Upon supposed fairness.' Shakespeare, Mer. of Ven, iii. 2. 94. Wounding supposed peace.' Id. 2 Hen. IV. iv. 5. 196.

Surcharge, sb. Surfeit: p. 83, 1. 20.

Surd, adj. Literally, without sound, unmeaning: p. 255, l. I.

Suspect, adj. Suspected, suspicious: p. 81, 1. 12; p. 260, 1. 19.

'Cer

tainly in Italy, they hold it a little suspect in popes, when they have often in their mouth, padre commune.' Essay li. p. 208.

Swelling, sb. Inflation of mind by pride: p. 10, l. 13. Compare 2 Cor.

xii. 20.

Syntax, sb. Arrangement: p. 182, 1. 28.

Systasis, sb. See p. 174, 1. 27.

T.

Table, sb. A tablet, picture: p. 57, 1. 31. A pair of tables,' p. 64, 1. 10. Who art the table wherein all my thoughts

Are visibly character'd and engraved.'

Shakespeare, Two Gent. of Ver. ii. 7. 3.

Taint, v. t. To sully, tarnish: p. 27, 1. 28. With the use of 'blemish and taint' in this passage, compare Macbeth, iv. 3. 124:

The taints and blames I laid upon myself."

Take up, v. refl. To check oneself: p. 65, 1. 23.

Take upon. To arrogate, assume to oneself: p. 65, 1. 31.

Tax, v. t. To censure: p. 24, 1. 4; p. 135, 1. 14. In the former passage the Latin translation takes the word in the modern sense. They tax our policy and call it cowardice.'

See note. Shakespeare, Tr. and Cr. i. 3. 197. Taxation, sb. Censure, reprehension: p. 62, 1. 17; p. 103, l. 27. 'You'll be whipped for taxation one of these days.' Shakespeare, As You Like It, i. 2. 91. Temperature, sb. Temperament: p. 21, 1. 26; p. 59, 1. 2. 'The best composition, and temperature is, to have opennesse in fame and opinion; secrecy in habit; dissimulation in seasonable use; and a power to faigne, if there be no remedy.' Essay vi. p. 22. Tenderness, sb. Sensitiveness: p. 192, 1. 29. tenance' bashfulness: p. 208, 1. 31.

'Lest I give cause

'Tenderness of coun

To be suspected of more tenderness
Than doth become a man.'

Shakespeare, Cymb. i. I. 94.

Term, sb. Limit, termination: p. 129, l. 14.
Terrene, adj. Earthly: p. 48, l. 13.

Alack, our terrene moon

Is now eclipsed.' Shakespeare, Ant. and Cl. iii. 13. 153. That, pron. That which: p. 66, 1. 30; p. 110, l. 8; p. 112, l. 9; p. 155,

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1. 2. The, used for the possessive pronoun its': p. 27, 1. 26. Compare the version in the Bishops' Bible of Lev. xxv. 5: That which groweth of the owne accord of thy haruest, thou shalt not reape.' And also Holland's Plutarch, p. 812 (ed. 1603): Aristotle and Plato doe holde, that matter is corporall, without forme, shape, figure and qualitie, in the owne nature and propertie.'

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The, redundant. 'At the first:' p. 37, ll. 7, II. • The which:' p. 37,1. 31;
p. 234, 1. 10.
Other the heathen gods': p. 38, 1. 25.
Theomachy, sb. A battle with the gods: p. 194, l. 18.

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Theory, sb. Speculation: p. III, 1. 33.

Think much. To take ill, grudge: p. 88, 1. 30.

Through-lights, sb. Lights or windows on both sides of a room: p. 97, 1. 25. Comp. Essay xlv. p. 183.

Throughly, adv. Thoroughly; p. 67, l. 28; p. 86, 1. 19. See Matt. iii. 12.

Through-passage, sb. Transit, traversing: p. 98, 1. 15.
Thwart, adj. Perverse: p. 17, l. 10.

Create her child of spleen; that it may live,
And be a thwart disnatured torment to her.'

Shakespeare, K. Lear, i. 4. 305.

To, prep. Designed to' = designed for: p. 234, l. 31. Comp. gain to,' P. 43, 1. 25; employ to,' p. 252, 1. 20. 'To' redundant in rather than

to suffer': p. 189, 1. 12. Comp. Colours of Good and Evil, p. 262; Yet you shall seldome see them complaine, but to set a good face upon it.' Tongue, sb. Language: p. 17, 1. 19.

Touch, sb. To give a touch of' to allude to, mention slightly: p. 96, 1. 12. Testing, examination, p. 153, l. 11, as of gold by the touch-stone. Touching, prep. Concerning: p. 59, l. 22; p. 88, 1. 25.

Tractate, sb. A treatise: p. 245, l. 17.

Tradition, sb. The delivery of knowledge: p. 166, 1. 8; p. 170, 1.5; p. 176, 1. 28.

Traduced, p.p. In the passage in which this word occurs, p. 20, l. 25, 'traduce' appears to be used with a distinct reference to its original meaning to lead along, lead in procession,' and so 'to parade.' Hence 'traduced to contempt' would mean 'paraded contemptuously, or so as to excite contempt.' Traducement, sb. Misrepresentation, calumny: p. 38, l. 1; p. 43, l. 31. "Twere a concealment

Worse than a theft, no less than a traducement,

To hide your doings.'

Shakespeare, Cor. i. 9. 22.

Translation, sb. A metaphor: p. 61, 1. 29. See note.
Travail, v. i. To labour: p. 49, 1. 7; p. 80, 1. 31.

Travail, sb. Labour: p. 10, 1. 27; p. 28, 1. 23, &c. Travails = pains : p. 208, 1. 22. See Num. xx. 14, Lam. iii. 5.

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Treacle, sb. p. 140, 1. 31. Formerly triacle from Gk. Oŋplakh, an antidote to the viper's poison. "Treacle," or "triacle," as Chaucer wrote it, was originally a Greek word, and wrapped up in itself the once popular belief (an anticipation, by the way, of homoeopathy), that a confection of the viper's flesh was the most potent antidote against the viper's bite. . . . Expressing first this antidote, it then came to express any antidote, then any medicinal confection or sweet syrup; and lastly that particular syrup, namely, the sweet syrup of molasses, to which alone it is now restricted.' Trench, English Past and Present, fourth ed. p. 188. Coverdale's version of Jer. viii. 22 is—'I am heuy and abashed, for there is no more Triacle at Galaad;' and of Jer. xlvi. II- Go vp (o Galaad) and bringe triacle vnto the doughter off Egipte.'

Trepidation, sb. Trembling; used in a literal sense: p. 94, 1. 19. Triplicity, sb. A threefold combination or nature: p. 4, l. 5; p. 188, 1. 18. Trivial, adj. Trite, commonplace: p. 174, 1. 17.

Trope, sb. A figure, generally of speech; here applied to music: p. 107, 11. 32, 33.

Tutor, sb. A guardian: p. 21, l. 11; p. 184, l. 1. See Gal. iv. 2. Typocosmy, sb. p. 176, 1. 21. Defined by Blount and others a figure or type of the world.' But this does not appear to me satisfactory. Among the means that help the understanding and faculties thereof' Bacon enumerates 'Lullius Typocosmia.' 'To reduce surnames to a Methode, is matter for a Ramist, who should happly finde it to be a Typocosmie.' Camden, Remaines, p. 95, ed. 1605. It seems rather to mean an orderly arrangement of the figures or types which play such an important part in the Art of Lullius.

Tyrannous, adj. Tyrannical: p. 61, 1. 30.

Tyranny, sb. Absolute power: p. 241, l. 8; p. 202, 1. 8.

U.

Unawares, at.
xxxv. 8.

Unexpectedly: p. 11, l. 7; p. 16, 1. 31. Comp. Ps.

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Uncomely, adv.

Ungracefully, awkwardly: p. 26, 1. 7.

Unconstancy, sb. Inconstancy: p. 38, 1. 33.

Uncredible, adj. Incredible: p. 35, 1. 28.

Understandingly, adv. Intelligently: p. 128, 1. 8.

Undertake, v. t. To deal with, contend with: p. 221, 1. 12.
Undervalue, sb. Depreciation: p. 4, l. 25.

Unlikest, adj. Most unlike: p. 235, 1. 26.

Universality, sb.

The study of general principles: p. 78, 1. 24.

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Unpartial, adj. Impartial: p. 234, l. 12.

Unperfect, adj. Imperfect: p. 91, l. 1; p. 240, l. 18. In the latter
passage the ed. of 1605 has unperfite.

Unproper, adj. Improper: p. 41, 1. 2.
Unsafety, sb. Insecurity: p. 236, 1. 24.
Untaxed, p.p. Uncensured: p. 56, 1. 19.
Unwinded, p.p. Unwound: p. 181, l. 15.
Unwrap, v. t. To disentangle: p. 246, l. 16.

Upon, prep. Used in phrases where we should now employ other pre-
positions. Upon a natural curiosity''out of a natural curiosity':
P. 42, 1. 20. 'Proceeding upon some inward discontent' = proceeding
from, &c.: p. 54, 1. 19. Upon a more original tradition': p. 104, l. 21.
'Upon displeasure': p. 221, 1. 33. Upon heat': p. 231, l. 23, &c. 'To
take advantage upon' = to take advantage of: p. 27, 1. 26. To do good
upon' to do good to: p. 201, 1. 9. Multiplying and extending their
form upon other things': p. 195, l. I. 'Study upon': p. 222, 1. 21.
'Be bold upon': p. 223, 1. 8. See Glossary to Bacon's Essays.
Ure, sb. Use: p. 151, l. 15; p. 171, 1. 27.

Use, v. i.

Use, sb.

To be accustomed: p. 21, 1. 3; p. 40, 1. 31.
Usance, interest, increase: p. 126, 1. 15.

V.

Value, v. t. To give value to: p. 118, l. 10.

Vaporous, adj. Boastful, vain: p. 15. l. 12; p. 123, 1. 31.

Variably, adv. Unsystematically: p. 153, 1. 22.

Vastness, sb. A waste, wilderness: p. 120, 1. 5.

Vehemency, sb. Vehemence: p. 177, 1. 25.

Ventosity, sb. Windiness: p. 7, l. 16; p. 95, l. 13.

Verdure, sb. Literally, greenness; and so, vegetation generally: p. 48,

1. 17.

Verity, sb.

Truth: p. 91, 1. 18; p. 109, l. 20.

Vermiculate, adj. Intricate, winding, like the moving of a worm: p. 31,

1. 23.

Versatile, adj. Changeable: p. 24, l. 1.

Order of things: p. 49, l. 16.

Vestiments, sb. Vestments, dress: p. 88, 1. 33. 'Vestimento, as Veste,
any vestiment or vesture.' Florio, Ital. Dict.
Vicissitude, sb. Change: p. 6, 1. 26.
Void, adj. Empty: p. 43, 1. 22.
Vollies, sb. Flights: p. 252, 1. II.
Volubility, sb. Rolling or twisting

From Fr. volée a flight of birds.
motion: p. 201, 1. 6.

Voluble, adj. Capable of revolving: p. 239, 1. 27.

Voluntary, sb. A volunteer: p. 66, l. 14.

Voluptuary, adj. Belonging to pleasure: p. 133, 1. 25; p. 143, 1. 26.
Vulgar, adj. Common, familiar: p. 54, 1. 8.

W.

Wait on.

Wait upon.
Want, sb.

To attend: p. 49, l. 17.

3.

To attend p. 95, 1.
Defect, deficiency: p. 237, ll. 21, 23.
Warrant, v. i. To attest: p. II, 1. 27.

Watch candle, sb. A night light: p. 32, 1. 32.

Compare Albumazar ii.
9; Why should I twine mine arms to cables, and sigh my soul to air?
Sit up all night like a watching candle, and distil my brains through my
eyelids?' 'My good old mistress was wont to call me her watch-candle,
because it pleased her to say I did continually burn (and yet she suffered
me to waste almost to nothing).' Bacon, Letter to King James (Works,
x. 280).

Water, sb. A piece of water: p. 105, 1. 9. Compare Tennyson, Morte
d'Arthur:

'On one side lay the ocean, and on one

Lay a great water, and the moon was full.'
Wavering, sb. Oscillation: p. 94, l. 19.

Way, in the phrase 'to hold way with' to keep pace with: p. 14, l. 16.
So to keep way with,' p. 113, 1. 10; 'to take the way' to take steps
or measures: p. 173, 1. 27.

Way, sb. A road: p. 144, l. 11; p. 246, 1. 25.

Ways. No ways' in no way: p. 28, 1. 16; p. 56, l. 25; p. 221, l. 15.
Weal, sb. Welfare, prosperity: p. 55, 1. 33.

1.

Wear, v. i. To suffer from wear or use: p. 15, l. 24.

Went of were current about: p. 68, 1. 5.

=

Were better, p. 217, l. 7; p. 222, l. 25. We should now say ‘a man
had better,' or 'it were better for a man &c.'

What time.

Whereas, adv.

At which time, when: p. 92, 1. 27.

Whether, pron.
Which, rel. pr.

Where: p. 68, 1. 9.

Which, of two: p. 195, 1. 32.

Who; used of persons: p. 9, 1. 18; p. 28, l. 21; p. 233,

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