The Advancement of Learning

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Clarendon Press, 1873 - Logic - 376 pages

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Page 38 - ... as if there were sought in knowledge a couch whereupon to rest a searching and restless spirit, or a terrace for a wandering and variable mind to walk up and down with a fair prospect, or a tower of state for a proud mind to raise itself upon, or a fort or commanding ground for strife and contention, or a shop for profit and sale ; and not a rich store-house for the glory of the Creator and the relief of man's estate.
Page 97 - The use of this feigned history hath been to give some shadow of satisfaction to the mind of man in those points wherein the nature of things doth deny it, the world being in proportion inferior to the soul; by reason whereof there is, agreeable to the spirit of man, a more ample greatness, a more exact goodness, and a more absolute variety, than can be found in the nature of things.
Page 144 - So that it was no marvel (the manner of antiquity being to consecrate inventors) that the Egyptians had so few human idols in their temples, 'but almost all brute : Omnigenumque Deum monstra, et latrator Anubis, Contra Neptunum, et Venerem, contraque Minervam, &c.
Page 97 - ... Therefore, because the acts or events of true history have not that magnitude which satisfieth the mind of man, poesy feigneth acts and events greater and more heroical : because true history propoundeth the successes and issues of actions not so agreeable to the merits of virtue and vice, therefore poesy feigns them more just in retribution, and more according to revealed providence...
Page 303 - Therefore the winds, piping to us in vain, As in revenge, have suck'd up from the sea Contagious fogs ; which falling in the land Have every pelting river made so proud, That they have overborne their continents...
Page 307 - Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As, to be hated, needs but to be seen; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace.
Page 327 - We beseech thee to hear us, good Lord. That it may please thee to illuminate all Bishops, Priests, and Deacons with true knowledge and understanding of thy Word, and that both by their preaching and living they may set it forth, and shew it accordingly ; We beseech thee to hear us, good Lord.
Page 68 - But the images of men's wits and knowledges remain in books, exempted from the wrong of time and capable of perpetual renovation.
Page 101 - The knowledge of man is as the waters, some descending from above, and some springing from beneath ; the one informed by the light of nature, the other inspired by divine revelation.
Page 95 - ... that latitude which is agreeable and familiar unto divine prophecies ; being of the nature of their author, with whom a thousand years are but as one day; and therefore are not fulfilled punctually at once, but have springing and germinant accomplishment throughout many ages, though the height or fulness of them may refer to some one age.

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