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II. What has been done for the advancement of learn

ing, and what is omitted

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THE EXCELLENCE OF LEARNING,

AND

THE MERIT OF DISSEMINATING IT.

OBJECTIONS TO LEARNING.

To clear the way, and, as it were, to make silence, to have the true testimonies concerning the dignity of learning to be better heard, without the interruption of tacit objections.

Objections of Divines

Objections of Politicians

Objections from the Errors of Learned men

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OBJECTIONS WHICH DIVINES MAKE TO LEARNING.

1. The aspiring to Knowledge was the cause of the fall

2. Knowledge generates pride

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3. Solomon says there is no end of making books, and he that increases knowledge increases anxiety

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We must not so place our felicity in knowledge as to forget our mortality: but to give ourselves repose and contentment, and not presume by the contemplation of nature to attain to the mysteries of God.

4. St. Paul warns us not to be spoiled through vain

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The sense of man resembles the sun, which opens and reveals the terrestrial globe but conceals the stars and celestial globe hence men fall who seek to fly up to the secrets of the Deity by the waxen wings of the senses. 5. Learned men are inclined to be heretics, and learned men to atheism

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It is an assured truth and a conclusion of experience, that a little or superficial knowledge of philosophy may incline the mind of man to atheism, but a further proceeding therein doth bring the mind back again to religion.

Let no man, upon a weak conceit of sobriety, or an illapplied moderation, think or maintain, that a man can search too far, or be too well studied in the book of God's word, or in the book of God's works; Divinity or Philosophy.

OBJECTIONS WHICH POLITITIANS MAKE TO LEARNING.

1. Learning softens men's minds and makes them unfit for

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Alexander the Great and Julius Cæsar the dictator; whereof the one was Aristotle's scholar in philosophy, and the other was Cicero's rival in eloquence: or if any man had rather call for scholars that were great generals, than generals that were great scholars, let him take Epaminondas the Theban, or Xenophon the Athenian.

2. Learning makes men unfit for civil affairs

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It is accounted an error to commit a natural body to empiric physicians, which commonly have a few pleasing receipts, whereupon they are confident and adventurous, but know neither the causes of diseases, nor the complexions of patients, nor peril of accidents, nor the true method of

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