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OF

ÉMINENT ARTISTS:

COMPRISING

Painters, Sculptors, Engravers, and Architects,

FROM THE EARLIEST AGES TO THE PRESENT TIME

INTERSPERSED WITH ORIGINAL ANECDOTES.

TO WHICH IS PREFIXED

AN INTRODUCTION,

CONTAINING

A BRIEF ACCOUNT OF VARIOUS SCHOOLS OF ART.

BY JOHN GOULD.

New Cdition.

IN TWO VOLUMES.-VOLUME II.

LONDON:

EFFINGHAM WILSON, ROYAL EXCHANGE;

WAUGH AND INNES, EDINBURGH; AND W. F. WAKEMAN, DUBLIN.

LONDON:

BRADBURY AND EVANS, PRINTERS, WHITEFRIARS,

(LATE T. DAVISON.)

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MAAN, or MAN (Cornelius), a Dutch painter, born at Delft in 1621, and died in 1706, aged 85. He was instructed in the rudiments of the art by an obscure painter, and having a strong inclination for travel, he went to Paris when he was very young, where he met with sufficient encouragement to supply him with the means of extending his journey to Italy, which was the ultimate object of his wishes. Arrived in the metropolis of art, he was indefatigable in his studies, and by the most assiduous application, during a residence of three years, he became an able and correct designer. He afterwards went to Venice, where the works of Titian, particularly his portraits, were the chief objects of his attention. He at length returned to Holland, after an absence of nine years, and established himself in his native city, where he distinguished himself as a painter of history and portraits, in the latter of which he particularly excelled. One of the most admired paintings at Delft is a large picture, by this artist, of the portraits of the most eminent medi

M

cal characters of his time, painted for the hall of the surgeons, which has more of the attributes of the Venetian than the Dutch school.— Pilk.

and

MAAS (Dirk), a Dutch painter, born at Haerlem about 1656. was at first a disciple of Hendrick He Mommers, who commonly painted Italian markets, and particularly excelled in the still-life, which he introduced, such as roots, herbs, fruit, and plants. But, after some time spent in practising under that master, he disliked that manner, those kinds of subjects; and therefore placed himself as a disciple under Nicholas Berchem, the best artist of his time, and with whose style he was particularly delighted. It was thought he might have made considerable figure in the manner of Berchem, had not his attention to it been withdrawn by his seeing some of the works of Hugtenburgh, which inspired him with a desire to imitate him; and from that time he gave himself up entirely to paint battles, chases, and such processions as were attended with cavalcades of horse.

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