Studies in Philology, Volume 22

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University of North Carolina Press, 1925 - Electronic journals
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Page 63 - For the mind of man is far from the nature of a clear and equal glass, wherein the beams of things should reflect according to their true incidence ; nay, it is rather like an enchanted glass, full of superstition and imposture, if it be not delivered and reduced.
Page 425 - LETTERS FROM AN AMERICAN FARMER; DESCRIBING CERTAIN PROVINCIAL SITUATIONS, MANNERS, AND CUSTOMS, NOT GENERALLY KNOWN; AND CONVEYING SOME IDEA OF THE LATE AND PRESENT INTERIOR CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE BRITISH COLONIES IN NORTH AMERICA. WRITTEN FOR THE INFORMATION OF A FRIEND IN ENGLAND, By J. HECTOR ST. JOHN, A FARMER IN PENNSYLVANIA.
Page 19 - How sleep the brave, who sink to rest, By all their country's wishes blest ! When Spring, with dewy fingers cold, Returns to deck their hallowed mould, She there shall dress a sweeter sod Than Fancy's feet have ever trod.
Page 15 - Untouched thy honied blossoms blow, Unseen thy little branches greet: No roving foot shall crush thee here, No busy hand provoke a tear. By Nature's self in white arrayed, She bade thee shun the vulgar eye, And planted here the guardian shade, And sent soft waters murmuring by: Thus quietly thy summer goes, Thy days declining to repose.
Page 18 - At Eutaw Springs the valiant died; Their limbs with dust are covered o'er — Weep on, ye springs, your tearful tide; How many heroes are no more! If in this wreck of ruin, they Can yet be thought to claim a tear, O smite your gentle breast, and say The friends of freedom slumber here!
Page 98 - This kind of writing, which was, I believe, borrowed from Marino and his followers, had been recommended by the example of Donne, a man of very extensive and various knowledge, and by Jonson, whose manner resembled that of Donne more in the ruggedness of his lines than in the cast of his sentiments.
Page 59 - Knowledge enormous makes a God of me. "Names, deeds, grey legends, dire events, rebellions, "Majesties, sovran voices, agonies, "Creations and destroyings, all at once "Pour into the wide hollows of my brain, "And deify me, as if some blithe wine "Or bright elixir peerless I had drunk, "And so become immortal...
Page 49 - tis a gentle luxury to weep, That I have not the cloudy winds to keep Fresh for the opening of the morning's eye. Such dim-conceived glories of the brain Bring round the heart an indescribable feud ; So do these wonders a most dizzy pain, That mingles Grecian grandeur with the rude Wasting of old Time — with a billowy main A sun, a shadow of a magnitude.
Page 208 - To th' instruments divine respondence meet; The silver sounding instruments did meet With the base murmure of the waters fall ; The waters fall with difference discreet, Now soft, now loud, unto the wind did call; The gentle warbling wind low answered to all.
Page 97 - If by a more noble and more adequate conception that be considered as wit which is at once natural and new, that which, though not obvious, is, upon its first production, acknowledged to be just: if it be that which he that never found it wonders how he missed; to wit of this kind the metaphysical poets have seldom risen.

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